In today’s society, it is so easy to acquire new things. Constant advertisements are showing us what we need. Stores are filled with things you didn’t know you needed. Internet shopping is easier than ever. Within minutes you can think of something that would be cool to have, find it online, and have it ordered. Many times it even arrives at your home within 2 days. All of this has added convenience to our lives but at the same time, it has overcomplicated it.

More stuff means…

  • More to clean
  • More repairs 
  • More to keep track of
  • Less space 
  • Less money
  • Less time

I used to get sucked up in the sales but once I realized all it got me was a house full of stuff I didn’t love, I made some changes. I stopped browsing stores and making impulse buys and I started being much more selective with what I purchased. Part of that process was making lists of the things I wanted instead of immediately buying something.

Before adding anything to a wish list I think it is wise to take an extra minute or two to determine if it is worthy of being added.

I ask myself:

  • Is this something that I will be getting to replace something else? Does the other item need to be replaced?
  • Is this something that will be a new addition? Do I have space for it? How have I been managing without it?
  • Do I currently own anything that could serve the same purpose and allow me to avoid the purchase?

Although most of the questions are straightforward, I originally found it difficult to rethink how I could use my belongings. However, the more I practiced the more I was able to find simple solutions within my home that solved the need I was feeling but didn’t require me to buy anything new.

My Example

Recently, I noticed that the small dresser two of my daughters were sharing was no longer working since their clothes were getting bigger. My first thought was to add a new dresser to my wish list but I stopped myself after asking myself my questions and rethinking my belongings.

After a couple of minutes of inventorying our dressers and storage furniture, I had a plan. The small dresser now holds some toys and replaced a cube storage shelf. I ended up putting that in my closet since I have far fewer clothes than I used to. My three drawer dresser went to my middle child who is similar to me in regards to her simplified wardrobe. Her oversized dresser then went to my other two to share. The whole process only took about an hour and saved me the cost of a dresser plus the space adding a new piece of furniture to my home.

Conclusion

Sometimes adding a new item to your home can be justified. However, if you take a minute to think it over before making a purchase you might be surprised by how often you will discover that you don’t need it. More often than not, what you have is good enough, you’ll be fine without the addition, or there is a free solution already in your home.

Next time you think you need something, take an extra minute or two to make sure.

Have you recently stopped yourself from buying something you didn’t need?